Inflatables

Measure under the Deployable measures related to physical infrastructure opportunities to address flood risk

Looking for more? Head back to the Measures Explorer to check out other flood and seismic measures.



DESCRIPTION:
Water-filled, polyester-coated fabric or geotextile fabric tubes that can vary from 19 inches to 10 feet in diameter and 50 feet to 200 feet in length. Multiple tubes can be connected to achieve longer lengths. System provides for flexible alignments, including 90 degree turns. Tubes are stackable and may require straps and anchoring when stacked, single units are self-anchoring due to filled weight.

©Flickr


PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE:
SHORELINE LOCATION: Upland





DESIGN LIFE:
ADAPTABILITY:
IMPACT ON THE WATERFRONT:
CONSTRUCTION COST:
Weeks
Low
Minor Intervention
TBD




COASTAL FLOOD HAZARDS MITIGATED:





Sea Level Rise
Storm Surge
Groundwater
Waves
Erosion




MEASURES COMPATIBILITY:
ECOSYSTEM SERVICES: Measure may affect these shoreline values
Flood
Seismic
All
All
Aquatic Habitat
Terrestrial Habitat
Water Quality
Carbon Storage




CONSIDERATIONS:

ADVANTAGES:

DISADVANTAGES:





  • Requires storage location and crew of workers to set up.

  • Scalable temporary flood mitigation solution.
  • Relative low initial cost compared to permanent measures.
  • Short implementation time.
  • Compact storage footprint.
  • No change to current waterfront (during non-storm periods)

  • Significant deployment effort (staff, multiple parts, equipment).
  • On-/off-site logistics coordination and space required.
  • Operation and maintenance program needed.
  • Limited lifespan/design life.
  • Not well suited for daily or monthly event occurrences.




CONSTRUCTION IMPACTS TO THE PUBLIC:

SEA LEVEL RISE ADAPTATION OPPORTUNITIES:

CASE STUDIES:





  • Temporary impacts during deployment and clean-up operations

  • Not adaptable

  • Texas DOT used inflatable flood barriers during hurricane Harvey




DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES:





Ecological Enhancements

Urban Design

Form
  • N/A

  • N/A

  • N/A




DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Based on desired level of flood protection, multiple units can be stacked upon one another. Additionally, varying unit diameters could be selected.
  • Tube diameters should be selected to withstand static and dynamic loads due to hydrostatic pressure, wave loads, and debris impacts.
  • Susceptible to puncture from debris.
  • Interface of deployable barriers with stairs and other level changes will need to be addressed.


SITE-SPECIFIC CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Well suited for temporary protection at building entryways, BART entrances and the Muni Portal.
  • Well suited along the waterfront in areas where the measures can be safety installed and anchored.
  • Potential temporary measure for seismic joint protection.


URBAN DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • As a temporary measure, the product does not improve or enhance the appearance of the waterfront or its views, nor provide benefits to the natural environment.
  • Due to the low height of the product, views at standard eye level will not be blocked, but circulation (pedestrians, bikes, and vehicles) may be restricted by its use.


INSTALLATION AND CONSTRUCTABILITY CONSIDERATIONS:

  • These temporary structures are easily deployed at the site by trained staff.
  • No permanent infrastructure is required for deployment.
  • A portable pump is required to fill tubes from nearby water source.


ARCHITECTURAL CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Deployable barriers should be placed in a manner that does not obstruct emergency pathways.
  • Deployable barriers should be temporary and removed as soon as feasible such that they do not impact access to waterfront structures and public access areas post flood event.


HISTORICAL RESOURCE CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Place and attach barriers in such a manner to avoid damage to historic structures.


OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Off-site shed/warehouse area is needed to store rolled-up tubes, pumps, and hosing.
  • Some systems can be set up in a trailer unit for easy, secure storage and transportation of an inflatable dam system.
  • Depending on diameter and stacked height of the barrier, the crew size can vary from 1 to 4 people.
  • Tubes should be inspected regularly for tears or punctures and patched as necessary.
  • The polyester-coated fabric or geotextile fabric is subject to long-term degradation due to ultraviolet exposure.
  • The typical replacement time frame is 15 to 20 years.


Other Types of Deployables:

Click the images and links below to explore other types of Deployables.


Post and PanelMechanical and Buoyant Gates



Sand Bags



Head back to the Measures Explorer to check out other flood and seismic measures.


Measure under the Deployable measures related to physical infrastructure opportunities to address flood risk

Looking for more? Head back to the Measures Explorer to check out other flood and seismic measures.



DESCRIPTION:
Water-filled, polyester-coated fabric or geotextile fabric tubes that can vary from 19 inches to 10 feet in diameter and 50 feet to 200 feet in length. Multiple tubes can be connected to achieve longer lengths. System provides for flexible alignments, including 90 degree turns. Tubes are stackable and may require straps and anchoring when stacked, single units are self-anchoring due to filled weight.

©Flickr


PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE:
SHORELINE LOCATION: Upland





DESIGN LIFE:
ADAPTABILITY:
IMPACT ON THE WATERFRONT:
CONSTRUCTION COST:
Weeks
Low
Minor Intervention
TBD




COASTAL FLOOD HAZARDS MITIGATED:





Sea Level Rise
Storm Surge
Groundwater
Waves
Erosion




MEASURES COMPATIBILITY:
ECOSYSTEM SERVICES: Measure may affect these shoreline values
Flood
Seismic
All
All
Aquatic Habitat
Terrestrial Habitat
Water Quality
Carbon Storage




CONSIDERATIONS:

ADVANTAGES:

DISADVANTAGES:





  • Requires storage location and crew of workers to set up.

  • Scalable temporary flood mitigation solution.
  • Relative low initial cost compared to permanent measures.
  • Short implementation time.
  • Compact storage footprint.
  • No change to current waterfront (during non-storm periods)

  • Significant deployment effort (staff, multiple parts, equipment).
  • On-/off-site logistics coordination and space required.
  • Operation and maintenance program needed.
  • Limited lifespan/design life.
  • Not well suited for daily or monthly event occurrences.




CONSTRUCTION IMPACTS TO THE PUBLIC:

SEA LEVEL RISE ADAPTATION OPPORTUNITIES:

CASE STUDIES:





  • Temporary impacts during deployment and clean-up operations

  • Not adaptable

  • Texas DOT used inflatable flood barriers during hurricane Harvey




DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES:





Ecological Enhancements

Urban Design

Form
  • N/A

  • N/A

  • N/A




DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Based on desired level of flood protection, multiple units can be stacked upon one another. Additionally, varying unit diameters could be selected.
  • Tube diameters should be selected to withstand static and dynamic loads due to hydrostatic pressure, wave loads, and debris impacts.
  • Susceptible to puncture from debris.
  • Interface of deployable barriers with stairs and other level changes will need to be addressed.


SITE-SPECIFIC CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Well suited for temporary protection at building entryways, BART entrances and the Muni Portal.
  • Well suited along the waterfront in areas where the measures can be safety installed and anchored.
  • Potential temporary measure for seismic joint protection.


URBAN DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • As a temporary measure, the product does not improve or enhance the appearance of the waterfront or its views, nor provide benefits to the natural environment.
  • Due to the low height of the product, views at standard eye level will not be blocked, but circulation (pedestrians, bikes, and vehicles) may be restricted by its use.


INSTALLATION AND CONSTRUCTABILITY CONSIDERATIONS:

  • These temporary structures are easily deployed at the site by trained staff.
  • No permanent infrastructure is required for deployment.
  • A portable pump is required to fill tubes from nearby water source.


ARCHITECTURAL CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Deployable barriers should be placed in a manner that does not obstruct emergency pathways.
  • Deployable barriers should be temporary and removed as soon as feasible such that they do not impact access to waterfront structures and public access areas post flood event.


HISTORICAL RESOURCE CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Place and attach barriers in such a manner to avoid damage to historic structures.


OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Off-site shed/warehouse area is needed to store rolled-up tubes, pumps, and hosing.
  • Some systems can be set up in a trailer unit for easy, secure storage and transportation of an inflatable dam system.
  • Depending on diameter and stacked height of the barrier, the crew size can vary from 1 to 4 people.
  • Tubes should be inspected regularly for tears or punctures and patched as necessary.
  • The polyester-coated fabric or geotextile fabric is subject to long-term degradation due to ultraviolet exposure.
  • The typical replacement time frame is 15 to 20 years.


Other Types of Deployables:

Click the images and links below to explore other types of Deployables.


Post and PanelMechanical and Buoyant Gates



Sand Bags



Head back to the Measures Explorer to check out other flood and seismic measures.


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