Planning for Our Future - TEST

Over the past two years, the Port’s Waterfront Resilience Program team has undertaken extensive studies, including the Multi-Hazard Risk Assessment, the USACE Flood Resiliency Study, and others, to better understand the potential consequences in the face of earthquakes and flooding, including sea level rise along the Port’s 7.5 mile jurisdiction from Aquatic Park in the north to Heron's Head Park in the south.

Study findings tell us there are areas along San Francisco’s waterfront at more or less risk of earthquake damage due to the different soil conditions - and higher and lower risk of near-term flooding due to elevations along the waterfront and future sea level rise projections. We now understand how earthquake damage and impacts from different flood events might impact people, the environment, and the economy, and which assets and services are most at risk along the Embarcadero.

The Port is using these study findings to prioritize projects in locations with the highest concentrations of people and the most critical emergency response assets, along with the urgency of seismic risk. The waterfront has been divided into 15 subareas for ease of understanding study results and need to reflect local conditions and considerations in resilience projects.

As part of its work, the Port has developed a list of potential measures to address urgent seismic risk to the Embarcadero Seawall and mid- to long-term flood risks along the entire waterfront. The goal is to combine seismic and flood risk improvements wherever feasible and cost-effective, recognizing the interconnected nature and urgency of these two hazards.

Ultimately, a series of measures will form “alternatives,” or project options, for selection for Proposition A bond funding in Winter 2020. These project options will serve as a catalyzing force for longer-term waterfront resilience planning through the Adapt Plan, which will include recommendations for additional actions that will need to be taken over the next 20 to 30 years to increase seismic and flood resilience.

Over the past two years, the Port’s Waterfront Resilience Program team has undertaken extensive studies, including the Multi-Hazard Risk Assessment, the USACE Flood Resiliency Study, and others, to better understand the potential consequences in the face of earthquakes and flooding, including sea level rise along the Port’s 7.5 mile jurisdiction from Aquatic Park in the north to Heron's Head Park in the south.

Study findings tell us there are areas along San Francisco’s waterfront at more or less risk of earthquake damage due to the different soil conditions - and higher and lower risk of near-term flooding due to elevations along the waterfront and future sea level rise projections. We now understand how earthquake damage and impacts from different flood events might impact people, the environment, and the economy, and which assets and services are most at risk along the Embarcadero.

The Port is using these study findings to prioritize projects in locations with the highest concentrations of people and the most critical emergency response assets, along with the urgency of seismic risk. The waterfront has been divided into 15 subareas for ease of understanding study results and need to reflect local conditions and considerations in resilience projects.

As part of its work, the Port has developed a list of potential measures to address urgent seismic risk to the Embarcadero Seawall and mid- to long-term flood risks along the entire waterfront. The goal is to combine seismic and flood risk improvements wherever feasible and cost-effective, recognizing the interconnected nature and urgency of these two hazards.

Ultimately, a series of measures will form “alternatives,” or project options, for selection for Proposition A bond funding in Winter 2020. These project options will serve as a catalyzing force for longer-term waterfront resilience planning through the Adapt Plan, which will include recommendations for additional actions that will need to be taken over the next 20 to 30 years to increase seismic and flood resilience.